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Home » Hugin » TM2 » 198X #80623094
198X Hugin TM2 Serial # 80623094 198X Hugin TM2 typewriter, Serial # 80623094 Truls Henriksson's 198X Hugin TM2 typewriter. 2020-11-30 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Truls Henriksson: 198X Hugin TM2 Serial # 80623094 My second typewriter to enter my collection, and I can assure you I'm not letting go of it any time soon. Sweden truly has no respect for good typewriters; I found this one at a thrift store for just $12! It was in perfect condition - almost mint, there were barely any scratches, blemishes or sticky keys - and is an absolute beauty to look at. All the plastic parts as well as the platen are pure black, which together with the shiny silver-colored metal creates a machine that is truly gorgeous. The body is matte black and the keys are glossy black. The reflection of the light in the slightly concave keys makes them pop without being bright or colorful. I really love this typewriter.

Performancewise, it's also near perfect. The keys are super light to press, and even the shift key which raises the carriage is surprisingly easy. The case doesn't take up more space than it needs to and blends in anywhere. I think I really struck gold here, because even if electric typewriters are easier to type with, this is really the most pure typing experience. I really feel like this typewriter has been sitting in someone's attic for the last 40-50 years not being used once before I found it in that thrift store.

The brand itself seems to have been a Swedish household appliances brand, but seem to have disappeared now. I couldn't find any information about their typewriters anywhere except for a few online auctions. After looking around a bit more, it seems like it's from the 1980s and not 70s like I thought at first (hence the 197X in the typeface specimen).

198X Hugin TM2 #80623094

Status: My Collection
Created: 11-03-2020 at 10:16AM
Last Edit: 11-30-2020 at 09:37AM


Description:

My second typewriter to enter my collection, and I can assure you I'm not letting go of it any time soon. Sweden truly has no respect for good typewriters; I found this one at a thrift store for just $12! It was in perfect condition - almost mint, there were barely any scratches, blemishes or sticky keys - and is an absolute beauty to look at. All the plastic parts as well as the platen are pure black, which together with the shiny silver-colored metal creates a machine that is truly gorgeous. The body is matte black and the keys are glossy black. The reflection of the light in the slightly concave keys makes them pop without being bright or colorful. I really love this typewriter.

Performancewise, it's also near perfect. The keys are super light to press, and even the shift key which raises the carriage is surprisingly easy. The case doesn't take up more space than it needs to and blends in anywhere. I think I really struck gold here, because even if electric typewriters are easier to type with, this is really the most pure typing experience. I really feel like this typewriter has been sitting in someone's attic for the last 40-50 years not being used once before I found it in that thrift store.

The brand itself seems to have been a Swedish household appliances brand, but seem to have disappeared now. I couldn't find any information about their typewriters anywhere except for a few online auctions. After looking around a bit more, it seems like it's from the 1980s and not 70s like I thought at first (hence the 197X in the typeface specimen).

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:





The case. Really clean and discrete.
The case. Really clean and discrete.



Inside the case. "Typewriter and case made in Japan".
Inside the case. "Typewriter and case made in Japan".

The Swedish letters ÅÄÖ are in the bottom row on most typewriters. On computers nowadays the Å is next to P, and after L comes Ö and Ä. The lever to the left is the keyboard spring setting, which goes from H(ard) to L(ight).
The Swedish letters ÅÄÖ are in the bottom row on most typewriters. On computers nowadays the Å is next to P, and after L comes Ö and Ä. The lever to the left is the keyboard spring setting, which goes from H(ard) to L(ight).

Top cover taken off.
Top cover taken off.



Serial number location
Serial number location

The carriage return lever folds down to fit into the case.
The carriage return lever folds down to fit into the case.

Hunter: Truls Henriksson (Kebabrulle4869)

Truls Henriksson's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 204

Young typewriter collector from Sweden. I've always been interested in tinkering with mechanical machines, and typewriters are perfect objects to tinker with, as you can get so much use out of them. I've always loved the primitive complexity of the machine that could make letters appear on a paper entirely mechanically, and that's why when I saw a Facit TP1 in a thrift store in February 2020, I knew I had to buy it.

And that's where this all started for me. Now I'm interested in the history of typewriters, and especially how the layout of the Swedish keyboards evolved and were standardized over time. I'd like to someday have a machine from each major era in typewriter history, so that they together tell a story of how they were developed. But I also like to use typewriters, and that's why I will happily get any typewriter that's unique among the ones I already have, whether that means having a wider carriage, being really quiet, or just being really good-looking.

And yes, that's my cat in my profile picture. Isn't he the greatest? :)



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Hugin TM2 on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Hugin Serial Number page and the Hugin TM2 By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.