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Home » Facit » TP1 » 1965 #P369992
1965 Facit TP1 Serial # P369992 1965 Facit TP1 typewriter, Serial # P369992 Truls Henriksson's 1965 Facit TP1 typewriter. 2020-10-31 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Truls Henriksson: 1965 Facit TP1 Serial # P369992 This is the first typewriter I ever bought! Found it at a thrift store for around $10. I like the rounded corners and the sturdy construction, it's a really well-made portable. It was missing its case when I found it, however.

But to be honest - it doesn't have the nicest colors, mainly only being gray and black. It's honestly a fairly boring-looking machine, but what it lacks in form it makes up for in function. It has levers for setting, removing, removing all, and setting default tab stops, as well as retractable paper support arms and a lever that locks the carriage in the center. The keys are comfortable if a litte bit tough to press, even on the lowest setting after cleaning. I really like that the backspace key is on the right side - it allows muscle memory to carry over from typing on a computer keyboard.

Overall though, a great machine and a pleasure to use.

1965 Facit TP1 #P369992

Status: My Collection
Hunter: Truls Henriksson (Kebabrulle4869)
Created: 10-31-2020 at 03:27AM
Last Edit: 10-31-2020 at 07:11AM


Description:

This is the first typewriter I ever bought! Found it at a thrift store for around $10. I like the rounded corners and the sturdy construction, it's a really well-made portable. It was missing its case when I found it, however.

But to be honest - it doesn't have the nicest colors, mainly only being gray and black. It's honestly a fairly boring-looking machine, but what it lacks in form it makes up for in function. It has levers for setting, removing, removing all, and setting default tab stops, as well as retractable paper support arms and a lever that locks the carriage in the center. The keys are comfortable if a litte bit tough to press, even on the lowest setting after cleaning. I really like that the backspace key is on the right side - it allows muscle memory to carry over from typing on a computer keyboard.

Overall though, a great machine and a pleasure to use.

Typeface Specimen:

Links:

Photos:

Shiny keys. Closer look of the keyboard layout further down.
Shiny keys. Closer look of the keyboard layout further down.

Right side. To the right of the platen knob is the carriage release lever. The lever below that removes all tabs if pushed up, and activates the default tabs if pushed down.
Right side. To the right of the platen knob is the carriage release lever. The lever below that removes all tabs if pushed up, and activates the default tabs if pushed down.



Left side view. To the left of the platen knob is the other carriage release lever, and the lever below that sets and removes individual tabs when pushed down and up respectively. Above the platen knob is the carriage return lever.
Left side view. To the left of the platen knob is the other carriage release lever, and the lever below that sets and removes individual tabs when pushed down and up respectively. Above the platen knob is the carriage return lever.

Here's a close-up of the keyboard. This is the old layout of Swedish keyboards, where ÅÄÖ are all next to each other in the bottom row. In the new layout, the middle two rows end with "I O P Å" and "K L Ö Ä".
I think this has been the standard since the 80s, since my electric typewriter from -85 has the newer layout. I'd love to know when exactly this changed and why though.
Here's a close-up of the keyboard. This is the old layout of Swedish keyboards, where ÅÄÖ are all next to each other in the bottom row. In the new layout, the middle two rows end with "I O P Å" and "K L Ö Ä". I think this has been the standard since the 80s, since my electric typewriter from -85 has the newer layout. I'd love to know when exactly this changed and why though.

In the top left is the carriage lock lever, pictured here in the locked state. It is unlocked by pressing it down. In front of that is the ribbon selector.
In the top left is the carriage lock lever, pictured here in the locked state. It is unlocked by pressing it down. In front of that is the ribbon selector.

To the right of the carriage return lever is the line space lever, and above that is the Line Space Platen Release (a mouthful, yes, but that's what the manual says). Moving right from that are the two margin stops, and then the paper release lever. Between the last margin stop and the paper release lever is the paper holder, folded down. The shiny metal square is the part used to pull it out with.
To the right of the carriage return lever is the line space lever, and above that is the Line Space Platen Release (a mouthful, yes, but that's what the manual says). Moving right from that are the two margin stops, and then the paper release lever. Between the last margin stop and the paper release lever is the paper holder, folded down. The shiny metal square is the part used to pull it out with.

Top cover removed. The ribbons are not original.
Top cover removed. The ribbons are not original.

Left side uncovered. In the bottom left, to the right of the screw, is the "touch control", which disappointingly enough isn't a touch screen, but rather a lever that controls the resistance of the keys.
Left side uncovered. In the bottom left, to the right of the screw, is the "touch control", which disappointingly enough isn't a touch screen, but rather a lever that controls the resistance of the keys.


Serial number location.
Serial number location.

Paper support arms folded out.
Paper support arms folded out.

Hunter: Truls Henriksson (Kebabrulle4869)

Truls Henriksson's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 204

Young typewriter collector from Sweden. I've always been interested in tinkering with mechanical machines, and typewriters are perfect objects to tinker with, as you can get so much use out of them. I've always loved the primitive complexity of the machine that could make letters appear on a paper entirely mechanically, and that's why when I saw a Facit TP1 in a thrift store in February 2020, I knew I had to buy it.

And that's where this all started for me. Now I'm interested in the history of typewriters, and especially how the layout of the Swedish keyboards evolved and were standardized over time. I'd like to someday have a machine from each major era in typewriter history, so that they together tell a story of how they were developed. But I also like to use typewriters, and that's why I will happily get any typewriter that's unique among the ones I already have, whether that means having a wider carriage, being really quiet, or just being really good-looking.

And yes, that's my cat in my profile picture. Isn't he the greatest? :)



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Facit TP1 on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Facit Serial Number page and the Facit TP1 By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.