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Home » Brother » Super 7300 » 1983 #M37064633
1983 Brother Super 7300 Serial # M37064633 1983 Brother Super 7300 typewriter, Serial # M37064633 Tas Kyprianou's 1983 Brother Super 7300 typewriter. 2023-11-06 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Tas Kyprianou: 1983 Brother Super 7300 Serial # M37064633 A freebie from Facebook Marketplace - Owner had it from new and completed her Btech on it but was having a loft clearout and gave it to me knowing its keys were no longer working.

I took it apart right away and with a little advice from a friend in Malaysia was able to get the keys to move the type ball but only the left-hand side of the keyboard "computed" correctly. The remaining keys typed gobbledygook. Regular gobbledygook but gobbledygook nonetheless. The machine felt great to use so I reached out to the excellent Golf Ball Facebook Group where none other than our guru Duane from Phoenix typewriters said:
" have had a couple of these recently, like yours, near mint condition, that were working, gave them away on free typewriter Saturday's. If they work, great, if not and especially mis-selection, forgetaboutit . . . . ."

Duane had spoken. I stopped spending any more time on it. Shame though. It had a wonderful action and the machine, despite its problematic nature, has a quality feel to it. I think it’s rather handsome too.
I enjoyed the "art" it made whilst testing it and include some of it here for PICA BALL typeface reference.

The search for a fully functioning golf ball machine continues . . .

1983 Brother Super 7300 #M37064633

Status: Parting Out
Hunter: Tas Kyprianou (Tas)
Created: 11-03-2023 at 06:49AM
Last Edit: 11-06-2023 at 10:51AM


Description:

A freebie from Facebook Marketplace - Owner had it from new and completed her Btech on it but was having a loft clearout and gave it to me knowing its keys were no longer working.

I took it apart right away and with a little advice from a friend in Malaysia was able to get the keys to move the type ball but only the left-hand side of the keyboard "computed" correctly. The remaining keys typed gobbledygook. Regular gobbledygook but gobbledygook nonetheless. The machine felt great to use so I reached out to the excellent Golf Ball Facebook Group where none other than our guru Duane from Phoenix typewriters said:
" have had a couple of these recently, like yours, near mint condition, that were working, gave them away on free typewriter Saturday's. If they work, great, if not and especially mis-selection, forgetaboutit . . . . ."

Duane had spoken. I stopped spending any more time on it. Shame though. It had a wonderful action and the machine, despite its problematic nature, has a quality feel to it. I think it’s rather handsome too.
I enjoyed the "art" it made whilst testing it and include some of it here for PICA BALL typeface reference.

The search for a fully functioning golf ball machine continues . . .

Typeface Specimen:

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This hairline crack along the drive shaft (?) can't be helping the mistyping matter.
This hairline crack along the drive shaft (?) can't be helping the mistyping matter.



Hunter: Tas Kyprianou (Tas)

Tas Kyprianou's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 3930

UK member with Greek Cypriot heritage, living in London.
Relatively new to the hobby - My first machine was an Everest Mod 90 that I bought after watching a Violet Evergarden anime in December 2021.
My collection now consists of 40 machines. Nice round number. Time to stop I reckon. . .

My absolute favourite remains (just) my 1939 Royal KMM. For me, it's both the prettiest and the "warmest" to type on. It has "Majik" (with a nod to Sandy1)
I count my blessings that I am lucky enough to have amassed such a beautiful bunch.



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