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Home » IBM » Correcting Selectric II » 1976 #93 4336811
1976 IBM Correcting Selectric II Serial # 93 4336811 1976 IBM Correcting Selectric II typewriter, Serial # 93 4336811 Tas Kyprianou's 1976 IBM Correcting Selectric II typewriter. 2023-05-17 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Tas Kyprianou: 1976 IBM Correcting Selectric II Serial # 93 4336811 I arrived at the seller's house only to see the machine dumped in the garage, next to a lawnmower.
Despite confirming with the seller that it was FULLY functional . . . twice . . . before heading out, the once magnificent Selectric II was dead as a doornail when I plugged it in. I began to walk away but the seller insisted on just giving me the thing. I had a strong feeling it was not within my skillset to repair it but thanked her and took it home for a laugh.

I was right about my hunch. Very right.
The list was long. No power when using a tester, everything was gummed up, and most white plastic parts were now yellow/orange and brittle or already broken. The golf ball removal mechanism broke. Couldn't even successfully salvage that. I did eventually manage to clean up the on-off switch and power it up only to hear the motor clank into life like an old tractor. It then died.

A friend who's repaired two Selectrics tried to help via text messages but my brain was not having any of it. I wasn't even able to salvage anything for him without breaking what he asked me to salvage. Utterly soul-destroying. These things are incredibly complex but utterly beguiling. I know that I will now forever be looking for a working one to call my own. To those of you who have one, bravo. To those of you who were able to repair one, I doff my hat to you and have my utmost respect.

1976 IBM Correcting Selectric II #93 4336811

Status: Parting Out
Hunter: Tas Kyprianou (Tas)
Created: 05-15-2023 at 10:36AM
Last Edit: 05-17-2023 at 03:02AM


Description:

I arrived at the seller's house only to see the machine dumped in the garage, next to a lawnmower.
Despite confirming with the seller that it was FULLY functional . . . twice . . . before heading out, the once magnificent Selectric II was dead as a doornail when I plugged it in. I began to walk away but the seller insisted on just giving me the thing. I had a strong feeling it was not within my skillset to repair it but thanked her and took it home for a laugh.

I was right about my hunch. Very right.
The list was long. No power when using a tester, everything was gummed up, and most white plastic parts were now yellow/orange and brittle or already broken. The golf ball removal mechanism broke. Couldn't even successfully salvage that. I did eventually manage to clean up the on-off switch and power it up only to hear the motor clank into life like an old tractor. It then died.

A friend who's repaired two Selectrics tried to help via text messages but my brain was not having any of it. I wasn't even able to salvage anything for him without breaking what he asked me to salvage. Utterly soul-destroying. These things are incredibly complex but utterly beguiling. I know that I will now forever be looking for a working one to call my own. To those of you who have one, bravo. To those of you who were able to repair one, I doff my hat to you and have my utmost respect.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:

Our first meeting.
Our first meeting.

The beginning of the end.
The beginning of the end.

Keys barely moved. Very stiff and gloopy
Keys barely moved. Very stiff and gloopy


Model 82 - made in Canada
Model 82 - made in Canada



Golf ball prior to breaking.
Golf ball prior to breaking.

The golf ball mechanism was incredibly stiff. Barely able to move it by hand.
The golf ball mechanism was incredibly stiff. Barely able to move it by hand.

metal ribbon for golf ball movement had come off the pulley.
metal ribbon for golf ball movement had come off the pulley.

This was broken
This was broken

This thing was rattling around inside.
This thing was rattling around inside.

This was broken
This was broken

Phoenix Typewriters helped show me how to un-gloop the on-off switch via a YouTube clip. THANK YOU.
Phoenix Typewriters helped show me how to un-gloop the on-off switch via a YouTube clip. THANK YOU.

Hmm.
Hmm.

This string was a taught as a guitar's.
This string was a taught as a guitar's.

Deteriorated foam everywhere.
Deteriorated foam everywhere.

The large plastic cog under the belt had a huge crack in it.
The large plastic cog under the belt had a huge crack in it.

My favourite part of the machine. SO cute.
My favourite part of the machine. SO cute.




Hunter: Tas Kyprianou (Tas)

Tas Kyprianou's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 3930

UK member with Greek Cypriot heritage, living in London.
Relatively new to the hobby - My first machine was an Everest Mod 90 that I bought after watching a Violet Evergarden anime in December 2021.
My collection now consists of 40 machines. Nice round number. Time to stop I reckon. . .

My absolute favourite remains (just) my 1939 Royal KMM. For me, it's both the prettiest and the "warmest" to type on. It has "Majik" (with a nod to Sandy1)
I count my blessings that I am lucky enough to have amassed such a beautiful bunch.



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the IBM Correcting Selectric II on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the IBM Serial Number page and the IBM Correcting Selectric II By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.