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196X Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Princess-Matic Serial # 376638 196X Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Princess-Matic typewriter, Serial # 376638 Gary Wann's 196X Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Princess-Matic typewriter. 2018-10-26 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Gary Wann: 196X Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Princess-Matic Serial # 376638 I saw this in an antique shop in Hereford UK known for their sales of typewriters. I was a little thrown at first as I was not familiar with the Scheidegger Princess-Matic, although being made in West Germany and feeling very solid, it would make a good addition to my collection. The case lid contained details of the 'Scheidegger' typing course and also the key to the case. The final decider was the very reasonable asking price. I didn't bother to haggle and I took it home!

Having done a bit more research, I now realise that this is a Keller und Knappich Princess 300 model, adopted by Willy Scheidegger for his 'Swiss Typing School" and badged 'Princess-Matic'. It would seem that Willy attracted some criticism by making his students purchase one of 'his' typewriters in order to complete the course. Further details can be found at the links at the bottom of this page. The serial number 376638 is not listed here in the database, but the typing course notes are dated 1965 and almost certainly came with the machine.

The Princess was in very good condition and only required light cleaning. The case bottom, which forms the base of the typewriter can be removed by carefully pulling the base away from the typewriter just of the left and right of the space bar. The case is secured at the front by two large metal studs passing through rubber grommets on the underside of the typewriter. The base then just unhooks off the rear of the machine. The metal panels are easy to remove by removing the easily accessible screws on the sides and the rear of the typewriter.

The mechanism revealed is fiendishly complicated with many small parts and springs, so that's as far as I went.

The typing action is very nice, although there is quite a 'thwack' when the type hits the platen, maybe this is just a very hard platen? I use an extra thick backing sheet and this does reduce the noise. The ribbon cover had a thin layer of foam glued to its underside - which crumbed to dust as soon as I touched it. I removed this 'dust' and will glue some felt in place to deaden the sound.

All in all, a nice machine to add to the collection and a perfectly serviceable typewriter.

196X Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Princess-Matic #376638

Status: My Collection
Created: 10-12-2018 at 06:34AM
Last Edit: 10-26-2018 at 03:42AM


Description:

I saw this in an antique shop in Hereford UK known for their sales of typewriters. I was a little thrown at first as I was not familiar with the Scheidegger Princess-Matic, although being made in West Germany and feeling very solid, it would make a good addition to my collection. The case lid contained details of the 'Scheidegger' typing course and also the key to the case. The final decider was the very reasonable asking price. I didn't bother to haggle and I took it home!

Having done a bit more research, I now realise that this is a Keller und Knappich Princess 300 model, adopted by Willy Scheidegger for his 'Swiss Typing School" and badged 'Princess-Matic'. It would seem that Willy attracted some criticism by making his students purchase one of 'his' typewriters in order to complete the course. Further details can be found at the links at the bottom of this page. The serial number 376638 is not listed here in the database, but the typing course notes are dated 1965 and almost certainly came with the machine.

The Princess was in very good condition and only required light cleaning. The case bottom, which forms the base of the typewriter can be removed by carefully pulling the base away from the typewriter just of the left and right of the space bar. The case is secured at the front by two large metal studs passing through rubber grommets on the underside of the typewriter. The base then just unhooks off the rear of the machine. The metal panels are easy to remove by removing the easily accessible screws on the sides and the rear of the typewriter.

The mechanism revealed is fiendishly complicated with many small parts and springs, so that's as far as I went.

The typing action is very nice, although there is quite a 'thwack' when the type hits the platen, maybe this is just a very hard platen? I use an extra thick backing sheet and this does reduce the noise. The ribbon cover had a thin layer of foam glued to its underside - which crumbed to dust as soon as I touched it. I removed this 'dust' and will glue some felt in place to deaden the sound.

All in all, a nice machine to add to the collection and a perfectly serviceable typewriter.

Typeface Specimen:

Links:

Photos:






I suspect that this machine was produced in 1965 or soon after.  The typing course notes are dated 1965 and I suspect that these came with the machine when it was purchased originally.
I suspect that this machine was produced in 1965 or soon after. The typing course notes are dated 1965 and I suspect that these came with the machine when it was purchased originally.

I suspect that this number is the Willy Scheidegger machine number as it doesn't correspond with the serial number stamped into the frame of the typewriter.  Willy required students to purchase (or hire) 'his' typewriters to complete the course, so it's quite likely that this is an inventory number.
I suspect that this number is the Willy Scheidegger machine number as it doesn't correspond with the serial number stamped into the frame of the typewriter. Willy required students to purchase (or hire) 'his' typewriters to complete the course, so it's quite likely that this is an inventory number.





Really neat ribbon colour changer button and indicator - black ink selected here. The third option is no ribbon for cutting stencils.
Really neat ribbon colour changer button and indicator - black ink selected here. The third option is no ribbon for cutting stencils.

Really neat ribbon colour changer button and indicator - red ink selected here.  The third option is no ribbon for cutting stencils.
Really neat ribbon colour changer button and indicator - red ink selected here. The third option is no ribbon for cutting stencils.

Tab set and individual tab clear rocker switch (+/-).  There is a lever at the rear right of the carriage to clear all the tabs at once.
Tab set and individual tab clear rocker switch (+/-). There is a lever at the rear right of the carriage to clear all the tabs at once.

Line increment control and indicator.
Line increment control and indicator.

Semi-rigid case, made up of the base which stays connected to the typewriter and the top cover.  The machine is made to be used with the base fitted, as although it's fairly easy to remove the base, there are no feet on the typewriter and the metal edges are quite sharp and the mechanics of the machine extend right to the base.
Semi-rigid case, made up of the base which stays connected to the typewriter and the top cover. The machine is made to be used with the base fitted, as although it's fairly easy to remove the base, there are no feet on the typewriter and the metal edges are quite sharp and the mechanics of the machine extend right to the base.

There is no carriage lock, but the carriage can be made reasonably secure by pulling the line feed lever towards the typewriter and hooking it over the platen knob.  The carriage can then be gently pushed to the right until the lever meets the body of the machine, effectively locking it.  I learned this by studying other photos of the Princess posted here on the Typewriter Database site.
There is no carriage lock, but the carriage can be made reasonably secure by pulling the line feed lever towards the typewriter and hooking it over the platen knob. The carriage can then be gently pushed to the right until the lever meets the body of the machine, effectively locking it. I learned this by studying other photos of the Princess posted here on the Typewriter Database site.

Apart form the very reasonable price, this was the other main factor in wanting to purchase the Princess.  Yes, that is the original key attached to the lever retaining cardboard 'device'.  Unfortunately, the Scheidegger patent coloured key caps didn't come with the typewriter.
Apart form the very reasonable price, this was the other main factor in wanting to purchase the Princess. Yes, that is the original key attached to the lever retaining cardboard 'device'. Unfortunately, the Scheidegger patent coloured key caps didn't come with the typewriter.

Hunter: Gary Wann (Ruyton)

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Retired Air Traffic Controller. Got my first typewriter from Santa when I was about 8 years old and woke my parents up at 3am as I just had to try it out when I woke up! Have had an old Imperial 58 in the family for longer than I can remember. A computer geek, but I just love the mechanics of typewriters and have started to collect a few more to keep the Imperial company!



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Princess-Matic on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Serial Number page and the Scheidegger (Keller und Knappich) Princess-Matic By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.