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Home » Hermes » Baby » 1969 #9158773
1969 Hermes Baby Serial # 9158773 1969 Hermes Baby typewriter, Serial # 9158773 Daniel Burgoyne's 1969 Hermes Baby typewriter. 2022-03-23 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Daniel Burgoyne: 1969 Hermes Baby Serial # 9158773 This Baby was made in Western Germany in 1969 or so and looks exactly like a Rocket model of the same vintage year also made in Western Germany. The shell and the cover are plastic, which makes for a very light machine at 4.2 kg or 9┬╝ lbs.

The carriage return lever is long like that on a Silver-Seiko model, the keytops are Hermes and the mechanism is frustratingly difficult to get out of the shell.

You need to reach inside the space between the back shell and the margin stops rail to insert a 6 mm socket wrench to loosen two nuts locking very small screws and then with a tiny but long screwdriver, undo those screws enough to be able remove the back piece of the shell without breaking anything (also remove the screws holding the feet). Then pry up the two plastic tabs connecting the sides of the main shell to the frame of the machine. Pull the frame back until the tabs prevent the mechanism from going back any further and pull the sides apart to let the mechanism though. You are now done if you are lucky and haven't broken the shell! See the photos and legends.

On a positive side, the keyboard action is actually quite nice for such a small machine. This is the only French Canadian keyboard on this model in the TWDB. The typeface is 12.7 cpi, actually it is an Elite 2 mm, S"7 typeface, made by Setag SA. The bell has a very useful loud ring.

It's not really a Hermes, in my view and, anyone wishing to have a similar machine for much cheaper, would do better to buy a Silver-Seiko clone of a less prestigious brand.

1969 Hermes Baby #9158773

Status: My Collection
Hunter: Daniel Burgoyne (Ixzed23)
Created: 03-13-2022 at 05:24PM
Last Edit: 03-23-2022 at 02:26PM


Description:

This Baby was made in Western Germany in 1969 or so and looks exactly like a Rocket model of the same vintage year also made in Western Germany. The shell and the cover are plastic, which makes for a very light machine at 4.2 kg or 9┬╝ lbs.

The carriage return lever is long like that on a Silver-Seiko model, the keytops are Hermes and the mechanism is frustratingly difficult to get out of the shell.

You need to reach inside the space between the back shell and the margin stops rail to insert a 6 mm socket wrench to loosen two nuts locking very small screws and then with a tiny but long screwdriver, undo those screws enough to be able remove the back piece of the shell without breaking anything (also remove the screws holding the feet). Then pry up the two plastic tabs connecting the sides of the main shell to the frame of the machine. Pull the frame back until the tabs prevent the mechanism from going back any further and pull the sides apart to let the mechanism though. You are now done if you are lucky and haven't broken the shell! See the photos and legends.

On a positive side, the keyboard action is actually quite nice for such a small machine. This is the only French Canadian keyboard on this model in the TWDB. The typeface is 12.7 cpi, actually it is an Elite 2 mm, S"7 typeface, made by Setag SA. The bell has a very useful loud ring.

It's not really a Hermes, in my view and, anyone wishing to have a similar machine for much cheaper, would do better to buy a Silver-Seiko clone of a less prestigious brand.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:

Nice long carriage return lever, as opposed to the small lever of the previous versions of the Baby.
Nice long carriage return lever, as opposed to the small lever of the previous versions of the Baby.

Line indicator with small card holder.
Line indicator with small card holder.

To remove the back plastic shell piece, first remove the feet under the shell, then reach inside by inserting a 6 mm socket between the shell and the margin stop rail, loosen the two nuts and then use a small screwdriver to undo the two screws in order to free the shell.
To remove the back plastic shell piece, first remove the feet under the shell, then reach inside by inserting a 6 mm socket between the shell and the margin stop rail, loosen the two nuts and then use a small screwdriver to undo the two screws in order to free the shell.

Fixed segment. The whole carriage does not shift, only the cylinder pivots up for uppercase.

Came with the right platen knob missing.
Fixed segment. The whole carriage does not shift, only the cylinder pivots up for uppercase. Came with the right platen knob missing.



From  the top left,  clockwise, right margin stop, paper release lever, paper bail thumb tab.
From the top left, clockwise, right margin stop, paper release lever, paper bail thumb tab.

Made in Western Germany by Hermes Precisa Büromaschinenfabrik G.M.B.H. Sackingen. A Paillard Product.
Made in Western Germany by Hermes Precisa B├╝romaschinenfabrik G.M.B.H. Sackingen. A Paillard Product.

Nice action keyboard.
Nice action keyboard.

Carriage slides smoothly and with little effort.
Carriage slides smoothly and with little effort.

Very even typebars.
Very even typebars.

Fremch Canadian keyboard.
Fremch Canadian keyboard.

Cover with a button on the front center to unlock.
Cover with a button on the front center to unlock.

Mechanism out of its shell.
Mechanism out of its shell.

Shell after cleaning. One has to pry the two slotted tabs up , move the mechanism back a bit, then pull the sides apart by force to get the mechanism out of there. Scared to break it when reassembling.
Shell after cleaning. One has to pry the two slotted tabs up , move the mechanism back a bit, then pull the sides apart by force to get the mechanism out of there. Scared to break it when reassembling.

Hunter: Daniel Burgoyne (Ixzed23)

Daniel Burgoyne's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 278

Bonjour! I am from the region of Montreal, Quebec and moved to Ottawa, Ontario in 1992.

Amateur watchmaker and machinist, I love anything mechanical, hydraulic or electric. I have restored American and Canadian clocks and small lathes, milling machines and a jig bore.

Most of my typewriters have Canadian-French Qwerty keyboards, with some exception for rare finds.



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