1046 Brands 3093 Models 20129 Galleries 12409 Typefaces 6273 Patents
Home » Everest » ST » 1952 #210407
1952 Everest ST Serial # 210407 1952 Everest ST typewriter, Serial # 210407 Hein Reinders's 1952 Everest ST typewriter. 2022-05-19 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Hein Reinders: 1952 Everest ST Serial # 210407 This Everest model S.T. was manufactured in 1952 (or 1953, see photo) and it is curious design.
Its outer shell is made of 3 mm gauge steel sheet, that is four times the gauge of car body tinplate. The back cover is a massive aluminium casting, and it better be sturdy since it is mounted by two nuts to the machine at the bottom only, freely overhanging the rest. Okay, it has logo casted in beautifully, but when raising the machine, it is advisable to grab under the right and left side, rather than under the front and rear.
The mechanism is hung from a cast iron frame, with a few aluminium cross members. The machine weights a hefty 15.1 kg, so, if your desk allows, it is a truly desktop typewriter.
The type-arm pull-rods are pivoted in a battlement shaped casting, see one of the photos, The pull-rods are in two parts, one with a corkscrew end, the other with a hooked end, twisted together.
Is this for length-adjustment? Is it for dampening the touch?
Apart from the (low quality-) chromed parts, all the mechanics are in black.
Standing on our windowsill, it is a Black Pearl.
That is to say, the cleaning of this machine required some effort. A few rubber dampening parts had fluidised and came dripping all over the mechanics. Its former owner may have been a talented and tormented author that sadly died of lung cancer before his masterpiece was finished: the machine required ten times cleaning its body parts before leaving no nicotine traces anymore.

On the right there is slider which untangles type-arms if they got stuck.
There is no automatic ribbon reverse. There is a button on either side that can be pushed to change the ribbon transport direction. The buttons can be turned to manually advance the ribbon. You may be tempted to pull the button: do not. You will only hold the button in your hand. This is a no-good design.

The ink ribbon is not transported in a continuous flow. There is a small jerks at every keystroke, both of the ribbon transport and the ribbon hopper, especially for the red colour. Now, if the giving ribbon spool turns completely frictionless, a ribbon loop will develop at the giving spool by its inertia. So, a good design provides a little bit of friction on purpose, over the natural friction that you cannot rely on. The Hermes Ambassador is an elaborate example. This Everest ST specimen had a wire spring pinching the right-hand spindle (see photo). On the left spindle, this spring got lost. A donor machine ST (#224337) had an eyebrow-raising design: the piece of cloth was wrapped around the spindle assembled freely with a tension spring (see photo). It is now in the #210407
The carriage is a self-contained functional element that can be taken from the machine after removing two knurled nuts. Re-positioning is easy.
The long levers at the right side of the carriage are a bit of a nuisance since they are in each other’s way. The longer lever serves to set and to clear a tab. The tab button is an aluminium pushbutton, to the right of the ‘firewall’ (with the logo).

The carriage has an escapement and a nice friction brake (see photo) that limits the speed at which the carriage moves to the left after pushing the tab button. Small detail: you must let the carriage move freely until it hits the stop, because it is only then that the friction-brake is decoupled. If you stop the carriage by hand you will have to move it against the friction.

This ST has a Dutch keyboard, with an ‘ij’ (as in weight) and an ƒ (from florijn, for guilder. The is no hash #. The machine has 10 cpi and large letters. The ruler that carries the two small cork paperrollers is from the donor-machine 224337. It has 12 cpi but its chrome shines irresistibly better. The 10cpi ruler is kept for those who prefer originality.

1952 Everest ST #210407

Status: My Collection
Hunter: Hein Reinders (heinemaat)
Created: 05-18-2022 at 04:35AM
Last Edit: 05-19-2022 at 03:16AM


Description:

This Everest model S.T. was manufactured in 1952 (or 1953, see photo) and it is curious design.
Its outer shell is made of 3 mm gauge steel sheet, that is four times the gauge of car body tinplate. The back cover is a massive aluminium casting, and it better be sturdy since it is mounted by two nuts to the machine at the bottom only, freely overhanging the rest. Okay, it has logo casted in beautifully, but when raising the machine, it is advisable to grab under the right and left side, rather than under the front and rear.
The mechanism is hung from a cast iron frame, with a few aluminium cross members. The machine weights a hefty 15.1 kg, so, if your desk allows, it is a truly desktop typewriter.
The type-arm pull-rods are pivoted in a battlement shaped casting, see one of the photos, The pull-rods are in two parts, one with a corkscrew end, the other with a hooked end, twisted together.
Is this for length-adjustment? Is it for dampening the touch?
Apart from the (low quality-) chromed parts, all the mechanics are in black.
Standing on our windowsill, it is a Black Pearl.
That is to say, the cleaning of this machine required some effort. A few rubber dampening parts had fluidised and came dripping all over the mechanics. Its former owner may have been a talented and tormented author that sadly died of lung cancer before his masterpiece was finished: the machine required ten times cleaning its body parts before leaving no nicotine traces anymore.

On the right there is slider which untangles type-arms if they got stuck.
There is no automatic ribbon reverse. There is a button on either side that can be pushed to change the ribbon transport direction. The buttons can be turned to manually advance the ribbon. You may be tempted to pull the button: do not. You will only hold the button in your hand. This is a no-good design.

The ink ribbon is not transported in a continuous flow. There is a small jerks at every keystroke, both of the ribbon transport and the ribbon hopper, especially for the red colour. Now, if the giving ribbon spool turns completely frictionless, a ribbon loop will develop at the giving spool by its inertia. So, a good design provides a little bit of friction on purpose, over the natural friction that you cannot rely on. The Hermes Ambassador is an elaborate example. This Everest ST specimen had a wire spring pinching the right-hand spindle (see photo). On the left spindle, this spring got lost. A donor machine ST (#224337) had an eyebrow-raising design: the piece of cloth was wrapped around the spindle assembled freely with a tension spring (see photo). It is now in the #210407
The carriage is a self-contained functional element that can be taken from the machine after removing two knurled nuts. Re-positioning is easy.
The long levers at the right side of the carriage are a bit of a nuisance since they are in each other’s way. The longer lever serves to set and to clear a tab. The tab button is an aluminium pushbutton, to the right of the ‘firewall’ (with the logo).

The carriage has an escapement and a nice friction brake (see photo) that limits the speed at which the carriage moves to the left after pushing the tab button. Small detail: you must let the carriage move freely until it hits the stop, because it is only then that the friction-brake is decoupled. If you stop the carriage by hand you will have to move it against the friction.

This ST has a Dutch keyboard, with an ‘ij’ (as in weight) and an ƒ (from florijn, for guilder. The is no hash #. The machine has 10 cpi and large letters. The ruler that carries the two small cork paperrollers is from the donor-machine 224337. It has 12 cpi but its chrome shines irresistibly better. The 10cpi ruler is kept for those who prefer originality.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:

With increasing speed the centrigugal force will press the felt dots against the inner wall of the drum and limit the speed of the carriage
With increasing speed the centrigugal force will press the felt dots against the inner wall of the drum and limit the speed of the carriage

pull rods that connect the key-levers (below)  to the linkages that pull the type-bars.
pull rods that connect the key-levers (below) to the linkages that pull the type-bars.

right side of the Everest ST cariage , with from left to right:
1) a lever to free the carriage from its rack
2) a lever to sset and release a tab
3 ) a lever to free the paper from the platen
right side of the Everest ST cariage , with from left to right: 1) a lever to free the carriage from its rack 2) a lever to sset and release a tab 3 ) a lever to free the paper from the platen

one of two springs that pull the typearm-basket against its upper stop. For capital letters the basket is lowered against a lower stop, both adjustable.
Below you see a leaf spring, being one of the links in a four-bar linkage that guides the basket up- and down movement
one of two springs that pull the typearm-basket against its upper stop. For capital letters the basket is lowered against a lower stop, both adjustable. Below you see a leaf spring, being one of the links in a four-bar linkage that guides the basket up- and down movement

the carriage assembly. You see the stationary frame with a few of the many tab-stops, the bell  and the clock-type spring. The pull-cord is green for reasons of lust in deviating from the obvious
the carriage assembly. You see the stationary frame with a few of the many tab-stops, the bell and the clock-type spring. The pull-cord is green for reasons of lust in deviating from the obvious

view from the right.
The small buttom in the flank is for pushing only and to change the ribbon directon
view from the right. The small buttom in the flank is for pushing only and to change the ribbon directon

Better view on the slider on the right flank which pushes all type-arms in their rest-position when pushed toward the back of the machine
Better view on the slider on the right flank which pushes all type-arms in their rest-position when pushed toward the back of the machine

View on the with from left to right:
1) margin release
2) ribbon colourselection
3)  tab release
4) next tab
View on the with from left to right: 1) margin release 2) ribbon colourselection 3) tab release 4) next tab

view from the right
view from the right

The massive aluminium behind of a Everest ST
The massive aluminium behind of a Everest ST

The moulded logos in the  Everest ST.
What is MOS?
The moulded logos in the Everest ST. What is MOS?

view on the carriage module with from left to right:
1) the lever to push for freeing the paper
2) a plastich knob to set the line spacing
3) a lever to push for freeng the carriage from its rack
4) the platen knob
5) the CR lever
view on the carriage module with from left to right: 1) the lever to push for freeing the paper 2) a plastich knob to set the line spacing 3) a lever to push for freeng the carriage from its rack 4) the platen knob 5) the CR lever

thee black beauty on the windowsill, gathering dust
thee black beauty on the windowsill, gathering dust

an Everest ST in a marinade of rubber paste and nicotine soot
an Everest ST in a marinade of rubber paste and nicotine soot

kind of escapement module.
The pinion on the left drives the friction break when pushing the tab-button
kind of escapement module. The pinion on the left drives the friction break when pushing the tab-button

photo for the fun of it
photo for the fun of it

the cast iron frame with the articulated arm that locks the typearm-basket in its upward position, unless the uppercase key is pressed. A brilliant feature of this machine, but hard to explain.
the cast iron frame with the articulated arm that locks the typearm-basket in its upward position, unless the uppercase key is pressed. A brilliant feature of this machine, but hard to explain.

the coil-shaped and its hooked counterpart of the pull-rod
the coil-shaped and its hooked counterpart of the pull-rod

the steps or battelment-shape crossmember that pivots pairs of linkages.
This photo is taken from the donor machine
the steps or battelment-shape crossmember that pivots pairs of linkages. This photo is taken from the donor machine

clean types
with a new felt instead of the molten rubber
clean types with a new felt instead of the molten rubber

the brake spring for the right ribbonspool. The eyelet is for the screw that holds it, the spoolspindle is between the u-turn
the brake spring for the right ribbonspool. The eyelet is for the screw that holds it, the spoolspindle is between the u-turn

a production date stamped in a steeel part
a production date stamped in a steeel part

the cover that comes over the friction brake.
What is the meaning of the numers?
the cover that comes over the friction brake. What is the meaning of the numers?

the dirty b as is was originally
the dirty b as is was originally

the design of the type-force adjustment. This seems to be a last minute addition to the design. Its function is questionable: the short spring is more or less compressed by the knob on the left and pushes against the sort arm of a lever. The long arm of the lever resist pushing a key more or less. Too complicated to explain .
the design of the type-force adjustment. This seems to be a last minute addition to the design. Its function is questionable: the short spring is more or less compressed by the knob on the left and pushes against the sort arm of a lever. The long arm of the lever resist pushing a key more or less. Too complicated to explain .

a photo from the donor machines ribbonspool brake: a leatherstrip aoound the spindle, held tight by a tension spring. How crude.
a photo from the donor machines ribbonspool brake: a leatherstrip aoound the spindle, held tight by a tension spring. How crude.

Hunter: Hein Reinders (heinemaat)

Hein Reinders's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 737

As a retired product development engineer, I am fascinated by the design of electro-mechanical products in which parts move, make noise and, preferably, radiate a little heat. Most preferred are products that are operated by keys, like typewriters, accordeons and pianos.
My genetics and statistics on lifetime expectancy suggest that it is time for me to let you know about the fantastic design, product engineering and manuacturing skills of the generation before mine. I salute mr. Munk for the opportunity that he has created for me to show it to the world. Okay, a bit bombastic.
Comments? Email me at hreinder1950@gmail.com



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Everest ST on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Everest Serial Number page and the Everest ST By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.