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Home » Olivetti » Studio 42 » 1946 #603758
1946 Olivetti Studio 42 Serial # 603758 1946 Olivetti Studio 42 typewriter, Serial # 603758 Denise vanRijswijk's 1946 Olivetti Studio 42 typewriter. 2024-03-29 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Denise vanRijswijk: 1946 Olivetti Studio 42 Serial # 603758 Found this Olivetti Studio 42 in a second-hand store in the Netherlands. Bought it for 50 euro with the original case. Interestingly there was a carbon ribbon in it and with a little bit of investigation you can still read what has been written with this typewriter in the early 80's. Didn't found the time to dive to deep in it, but I already found some interesting names and addresses within the first few lines of reading. Using carbon ribbons in typewriters surely isn't the most discrite way of trusting all your secrets to the paper.

Since this typewriter is from 1946, I highly doubt that carbon ribbons were already on the market, which means that the last owner spooled it by hand onto the original metal spools. I really like the clear and crisp font that you get from using it and it is a lot less messier then ink ribbons. Therefore I ordered a box of second-hand carbon ink ribbons, originally produced for the Olivetti editor 3c. I spooled them on new metal spools and it works like a charm. You can see it on the Typeface specimen sample.

I really like the esthetics of my Corona Four and Corona Standard (flat-top), but this Olivetti Studio 42 is by far the best typewriter in my collection when it comes down to performance. The typing feels very smooth, it's a sturdy machine and the table function (with the red key) works like a charm.

1946 Olivetti Studio 42 #603758

Status: My Collection
Hunter: Denise vanRijswijk (dvanrijswijk)
Created: 03-29-2024 at 05:51AM
Last Edit: 03-29-2024 at 05:59AM


Description:

Found this Olivetti Studio 42 in a second-hand store in the Netherlands. Bought it for 50 euro with the original case. Interestingly there was a carbon ribbon in it and with a little bit of investigation you can still read what has been written with this typewriter in the early 80's. Didn't found the time to dive to deep in it, but I already found some interesting names and addresses within the first few lines of reading. Using carbon ribbons in typewriters surely isn't the most discrite way of trusting all your secrets to the paper.

Since this typewriter is from 1946, I highly doubt that carbon ribbons were already on the market, which means that the last owner spooled it by hand onto the original metal spools. I really like the clear and crisp font that you get from using it and it is a lot less messier then ink ribbons. Therefore I ordered a box of second-hand carbon ink ribbons, originally produced for the Olivetti editor 3c. I spooled them on new metal spools and it works like a charm. You can see it on the Typeface specimen sample.

I really like the esthetics of my Corona Four and Corona Standard (flat-top), but this Olivetti Studio 42 is by far the best typewriter in my collection when it comes down to performance. The typing feels very smooth, it's a sturdy machine and the table function (with the red key) works like a charm.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:







Hunter: Denise vanRijswijk (dvanrijswijk)

Denise vanRijswijk's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 67

Travel blogger and former Graphic Designer from the Netherlands, with a passion for writing, illustrating and photography. Deeply in love with my Corona 4 from 1928, which started my interest in finding beautiful typewriters and fixing them up. I mainly like classic typewriters (with glass keys) from the 20's, 30's and 40's. But I am still in a search for an even older model.



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