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Home » Burroughs » 60 » 1938 #C60A231676
1938 Burroughs 60 Serial # C60A231676 1938 Burroughs 60 typewriter, Serial # C60A231676 James Gifford's 1938 Burroughs 60 typewriter. 2020-09-07 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of James Gifford: 1938 Burroughs 60 Serial # C60A231676 I bought this locally, which is good as the machine is so heavy at 40 or so pounds of dead weight and bulky that I wouldn't have wanted to pay for shipping. The seller, another local collector, wanted more space for his other machines and I was happy to oblige. This Burroughs is in terrific cosmetic condition. Note the absence of a carriage return lever and the addition of the electric carriage return key. The drawband has come off and I'm having a heck of a time removing the final screw on the back panel without damaging the paint (this explains the absence of screws in the photo), and no stores are open here for the stat holiday. I don't want to be the guy to ruin a paint job that's survived 90 years by trying to remove it with a pocket knife. I plugged in the frightening two-prong cord and it came alive, humming and clicking. It had that smell of a lamp that hasn't been turned on in some time: burning dust. When I get the drawband repaired, I hope to try out the electric carriage return and shift. From what I've read, this model debuted in 1932 and was still advertised in 1933 so I can't nail down the exact year, and Burroughs ceased making typewriters entirely in 1936. Burroughs called Detroit home, though this one was made in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, across the river (and border) from Detroit. I'd guess that it was manufactured in Detroit and assembled in Windsor to get around import laws or tariffs, as I can see no other reason to have a duplicate factory two miles from the first.

1938 Burroughs 60 #C60A231676

Status: My Collection
Created: 01-02-2017 at 08:46AM
Last Edit: 09-07-2020 at 03:21PM


Description:

I bought this locally, which is good as the machine is so heavy at 40 or so pounds of dead weight and bulky that I wouldn't have wanted to pay for shipping. The seller, another local collector, wanted more space for his other machines and I was happy to oblige. This Burroughs is in terrific cosmetic condition. Note the absence of a carriage return lever and the addition of the electric carriage return key. The drawband has come off and I'm having a heck of a time removing the final screw on the back panel without damaging the paint (this explains the absence of screws in the photo), and no stores are open here for the stat holiday. I don't want to be the guy to ruin a paint job that's survived 90 years by trying to remove it with a pocket knife. I plugged in the frightening two-prong cord and it came alive, humming and clicking. It had that smell of a lamp that hasn't been turned on in some time: burning dust. When I get the drawband repaired, I hope to try out the electric carriage return and shift. From what I've read, this model debuted in 1932 and was still advertised in 1933 so I can't nail down the exact year, and Burroughs ceased making typewriters entirely in 1936. Burroughs called Detroit home, though this one was made in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, across the river (and border) from Detroit. I'd guess that it was manufactured in Detroit and assembled in Windsor to get around import laws or tariffs, as I can see no other reason to have a duplicate factory two miles from the first.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:

Carriage return key. (Sorry for the poor lighting; I tried.)
Carriage return key. (Sorry for the poor lighting; I tried.)





Hunter: James Gifford (giffer)

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I am a writer and book editor as well as a collector of typewriters. It started with an Hermes 3000 desktop, which I stupidly sold last year, but now another sits on my desk for typing envelopes with a beautiful sans serif typeface. I type every day on different machines in my collection, which stands at about 60 at the moment. Favourites include my two 3000s, a 1930s Smith-Corona Silent, the Olivetti Studio 44 (red case), and a crinkle, chrome-encircled Royal Quiet Deluxe. I have also been finding very inexpensive Royal 10s of late; I currently own three, two from the 1910s and the other a later model, and another (1931) I sold to a friend at cost for his son, who appreciates vintage things. I am always on the lookout for new and interesting machines and often trade or sell to try new models. Living and working in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Burroughs 60 on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Burroughs Serial Number page and the Burroughs 60 By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.