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Home » Erika » 5 » 1931 #137323
1931 Erika 5 Serial # 137323 1931 Erika 5 typewriter, Serial # 137323 Javier Vazquez del Olmo's 1931 Erika 5 typewriter. 2019-10-11 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Javier Vazquez del Olmo: 1931 Erika 5 Serial # 137323 At first glance I thought this typewriter was seriously thrashed and beyond any hope of recovery, but only at the very first glance.

The first thing that I noticed was the absence of the line advance lever, then the lack of back feet, then the decrepit looking case... But I was told to take a closer look when I was like "Errrrr... I think I don't need this typew-". I took a closer look and there was nothing wrong with the line advance system. No return lever, but a "pinch" type machine (in the line of the Corona 3, the Senta...). I was expecting a lever because I didn't realize I was looking at an Erika 5. I thought this was another Modell S (I already have one of those), so the burgundy livery wasn't enough to convince me to get it, and even less if there were mechanical problems. So, after realizing this was a different (little) beast, I focused a bit more and realized this typewriter had been serviced. New drawband, new ribbon, not too much dirt (excluding several candy pebbles, see photo) and overall decent condition apart from the missing back feet. I just needed a few keystrokes to change my mind, and now this typewriter is happily at home and ready to fill up a lot of pages. The spring loaded typebars are FAST, so you can type as fast as your brain allows your hands. No risk of entangling types. The "downside" is that along with speed comes force, and the typeslugs give the platen quite a beating. It's mandatory to use some additional paper to cushion the punching.

Another "downside" is the French AZERTY keyboard. I'm pretty much used to the weird placement of the A and M, but I can't put inside my mind the fact that the numbers are in the caps position.

1931 Erika 5 #137323

Status: My Collection
Created: 10-11-2019 at 02:50AM
Last Edit: 10-11-2019 at 02:56AM


Description:

At first glance I thought this typewriter was seriously thrashed and beyond any hope of recovery, but only at the very first glance.

The first thing that I noticed was the absence of the line advance lever, then the lack of back feet, then the decrepit looking case... But I was told to take a closer look when I was like "Errrrr... I think I don't need this typew-". I took a closer look and there was nothing wrong with the line advance system. No return lever, but a "pinch" type machine (in the line of the Corona 3, the Senta...). I was expecting a lever because I didn't realize I was looking at an Erika 5. I thought this was another Modell S (I already have one of those), so the burgundy livery wasn't enough to convince me to get it, and even less if there were mechanical problems. So, after realizing this was a different (little) beast, I focused a bit more and realized this typewriter had been serviced. New drawband, new ribbon, not too much dirt (excluding several candy pebbles, see photo) and overall decent condition apart from the missing back feet. I just needed a few keystrokes to change my mind, and now this typewriter is happily at home and ready to fill up a lot of pages. The spring loaded typebars are FAST, so you can type as fast as your brain allows your hands. No risk of entangling types. The "downside" is that along with speed comes force, and the typeslugs give the platen quite a beating. It's mandatory to use some additional paper to cushion the punching.

Another "downside" is the French AZERTY keyboard. I'm pretty much used to the weird placement of the A and M, but I can't put inside my mind the fact that the numbers are in the caps position.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:

Unappealing case, but never judge a book by the cover.
Unappealing case, but never judge a book by the cover.



No back feet, but no big trouble.
No back feet, but no big trouble.


No return lever, but no big trouble again.
No return lever, but no big trouble again.




That bright green thingy is a piece of candy. I found another red bit of it jammed between the platen and the paper tray. Maybe a kid (or not) was around eating candy
That bright green thingy is a piece of candy. I found another red bit of it jammed between the platen and the paper tray. Maybe a kid (or not) was around eating candy

Hunter: Javier Vazquez del Olmo (Javi)

Javier Vazquez del Olmo's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 5488

The first typewriter I saw was my grandpa´s Olivetti Linea 98 at the office. It was just a curio for me. Then I was given a Nakajima, which I didn´t use and my grandfather took it from me because it was easier to handle than the bulky Linea 98. Now I own that typewriter, and I started a little collection in Valladolid, Spain. The Nakajima, which is "my" typewriter only returned home in 2017, almost 20 years later, when he wanted a better typewriter.

A collection that started small grew into something bigger, a nuisace for my family and a great source of satisfaction for me.



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