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1922 Corona 3 Serial # 518328 1922 Corona 3 typewriter, Serial # 518328 Mighty Jabba's 1922 Corona 3 typewriter. 2023-04-22 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Mighty Jabba: 1922 Corona 3 Serial # 518328 This was my first typewriter that was truly an "antique." One reason I bought it was that it and its case were in quite good condition, and it even included a few extras like a typed card from 1923 detailing when it was sold from one individual to another for $25, the original manual, and an envelope with a 3-cent stamp that had "broken part" written on it in pencil. It contained the parts for the machine's shift lock, which must have come loose many decades ago and just never been replaced. I'll admit it is quite difficult to put back, but I managed to do it and it now functions. (The parts were wrapped in a piece of scrap paper that had some typing on it -- most of it was just standard testing gibberish, but at the bottom it had the words "candy candy teacher sister brother fathermother" which I thought was kind of cute.)

When I got it, the machine would not allow paper to be fed through the rollers, and when I tried I ended up with a bunch of black shards of petrified rubber -- the feed rollers were completely done for. I decided to replace the rubber on the main roller using heat shrink tubing and a heat gun, which I had heard people have done before with typewriters. And I'll have to say, it worked great! I can now feed paper in (although the hard platen makes this still a bit tricky). After a cleaning, everything works, although the Q key will sometimes stick for reasons that I can't quite figure out -- it is probably slightly bent, but I am reluctant to do too much to try and fix it. Overall, I really like this machine and its 3-bank keyboard. Somehow it doesn't seem that strange now that I'm used to typing on a phone keyboard.

1922 Corona 3 #518328

Status: My Collection
Hunter: Mighty Jabba (MightyJabba)
Created: 04-22-2023 at 07:51AM
Last Edit: 04-22-2023 at 07:57AM


Description:

This was my first typewriter that was truly an "antique." One reason I bought it was that it and its case were in quite good condition, and it even included a few extras like a typed card from 1923 detailing when it was sold from one individual to another for $25, the original manual, and an envelope with a 3-cent stamp that had "broken part" written on it in pencil. It contained the parts for the machine's shift lock, which must have come loose many decades ago and just never been replaced. I'll admit it is quite difficult to put back, but I managed to do it and it now functions. (The parts were wrapped in a piece of scrap paper that had some typing on it -- most of it was just standard testing gibberish, but at the bottom it had the words "candy candy teacher sister brother fathermother" which I thought was kind of cute.)

When I got it, the machine would not allow paper to be fed through the rollers, and when I tried I ended up with a bunch of black shards of petrified rubber -- the feed rollers were completely done for. I decided to replace the rubber on the main roller using heat shrink tubing and a heat gun, which I had heard people have done before with typewriters. And I'll have to say, it worked great! I can now feed paper in (although the hard platen makes this still a bit tricky). After a cleaning, everything works, although the Q key will sometimes stick for reasons that I can't quite figure out -- it is probably slightly bent, but I am reluctant to do too much to try and fix it. Overall, I really like this machine and its 3-bank keyboard. Somehow it doesn't seem that strange now that I'm used to typing on a phone keyboard.

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Hunter: Mighty Jabba (MightyJabba)

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