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1915 Fox 24 Serial # 100291 1915 Fox 24 typewriter, Serial # 100291 Plante and Doole-Fisher Typewriters's 1915 Fox 24 typewriter. 2019-05-13 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Plante and Doole-Fisher Typewriters: 1915 Fox 24 Serial # 100291 The Fox typewriter manufacturing company was only operative for a short period of time, commencing production in 1898, and seizing operation after the Fox V. Corona lawsuit that occurred in 1921. In that window of 23 years , they build a style of standard typewriter that appears to be completely stand-alone, mechanically as well as aesthetically from any equivalent that was available during that time. The up-strike predecessor Fox standards had a slight resemblance of a Densmore in some ways, and mechanically perhaps inspired by the classic Underwood which was on the market in that same era. Despite their premature demise, the quality of their machinery is profoundly fascinating. This particular machine happens to be a very well preserved example that after plenty of elbow grease, currently sits in a condition fit for regular use. The appliques and handpainted pin-striping is as though not a day has passed. And although patina is present in some parts, there is no corrosion of note, or signs of ill use. Evidently having been used predominantly by an individual who possessed very long nails, the keys have literally been "dug in", and therefor the markings have long gone, forming the only but primary functional flaw this typewriter has. The purpose ofFox's custom-designed "ribbon-oscillator" still remains a mystery to Sean and I. Even though the mechanics of this function are in plain sight, it is very difficult to comprehend how it impacts the ribbon-advance mechanism in any way.
The original condition it was found it was not particularly bad. It did require a deep-cleaning which warranted disassembly of the carriage and most of the type-basket. The original asbestos key-rest had disintegrated with time, but a little bit of ingenuity and some grounded heavy-duty extension wire from a transformer box proved to be as close to a factory replacement as anyone is likely to find, and works very well. The typewriter is very tastefully decorated and really resembles a certain period in time. Despite it's significant age, the typewriter is mechanically fit enough to see regular use, and I will see to it that it does. The machines is of joined ownership between me and Sean, and I am very happy that we had the opportunity to rescue it from it's predictable museum-like destination.

~ Dirk

1915 Fox 24 #100291

Status: My Collection
Created: 05-13-2019 at 07:05PM
Last Edit: 05-13-2019 at 07:05PM


Description:

The Fox typewriter manufacturing company was only operative for a short period of time, commencing production in 1898, and seizing operation after the Fox V. Corona lawsuit that occurred in 1921. In that window of 23 years , they build a style of standard typewriter that appears to be completely stand-alone, mechanically as well as aesthetically from any equivalent that was available during that time. The up-strike predecessor Fox standards had a slight resemblance of a Densmore in some ways, and mechanically perhaps inspired by the classic Underwood which was on the market in that same era. Despite their premature demise, the quality of their machinery is profoundly fascinating. This particular machine happens to be a very well preserved example that after plenty of elbow grease, currently sits in a condition fit for regular use. The appliques and handpainted pin-striping is as though not a day has passed. And although patina is present in some parts, there is no corrosion of note, or signs of ill use. Evidently having been used predominantly by an individual who possessed very long nails, the keys have literally been "dug in", and therefor the markings have long gone, forming the only but primary functional flaw this typewriter has. The purpose ofFox's custom-designed "ribbon-oscillator" still remains a mystery to Sean and I. Even though the mechanics of this function are in plain sight, it is very difficult to comprehend how it impacts the ribbon-advance mechanism in any way.
The original condition it was found it was not particularly bad. It did require a deep-cleaning which warranted disassembly of the carriage and most of the type-basket. The original asbestos key-rest had disintegrated with time, but a little bit of ingenuity and some grounded heavy-duty extension wire from a transformer box proved to be as close to a factory replacement as anyone is likely to find, and works very well. The typewriter is very tastefully decorated and really resembles a certain period in time. Despite it's significant age, the typewriter is mechanically fit enough to see regular use, and I will see to it that it does. The machines is of joined ownership between me and Sean, and I am very happy that we had the opportunity to rescue it from it's predictable museum-like destination.

~ Dirk

Typeface Specimen:

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Hunter: Plante and Doole-Fisher Typewriters (venneburgtypewriters)

Plante and Doole-Fisher Typewriters's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 2301

This gallery represents the machines owned by good friends Dirk Plante and Sean Doole, who reside in British Columbia, Canada. Together they have established Venneburg Typewriters, a partnership that to date has seen over 400 typewriters since 2009. Here you will find the machines that are currently still in possession or that have come and gone since December 2017.



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Fox 24 on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Fox Serial Number page and the Fox 24 By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.