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1914 Continental Standard Serial # 72194 1914 Continental Standard typewriter, Serial # 72194 Aaron Friedrich Lotar Rolf Klamp's 1914 Continental Standard typewriter. 2023-02-24 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Aaron Friedrich Lotar Rolf Klamp: 1914 Continental Standard Serial # 72194 A Neighbor, who have heard of my hobby, once came to me, showing what he had just purchased at a near fleemarket, wanting to know if he had bought something valuable here, or at least, payed not to much for it.
It was very gringy, dusty, and overall not working, but with the 15€ he spent I told him, that it was ok but nothing of great value, as it is one of the most produced German Typewriters of all time.

So it stayed as Decoration at his place for some time, but when his Girlfriend got pregnant and they attempted to move to a bigger appartement, he wanted to sell the Continental again.
Of course he offered it to me, but I refused first, as I was and am allready stuffed with a lot of Patients, that were more interessting than this.

But when the date of moving came closer, and his online offer went fruitless, I accepted to adopt the „Conti“, to help him put it out of his head.

What I instantly liked about this Model is the way the mechanical solutions are aproached. It has all necessary features of its time, but for everyone of them they seemingly used some kind of lever, what make it all feels a little laborious, yet simultaneously solid and rational.

So one day, I started to give it full attention, taking it apart and cleaning. Everthing was stuck from dust and superficial rust. The Typelevers didn´t move willingly, as the segment was gringed. The shift-mechanism didn´t move cause of rust at the platen guiding. The backlever didn´t react, as there was an internal bended lever, which caused material fatique, that later made it snap in two. Presumably the gringed escapement in addition with brute force, has caused this in the first place.

Besides thorough cleaning and oiling, to get things going and defreeze the Carriage shift-mechanism, I had to wield somehow the snapped lever inside. Of course it would have bin compairable easy to find a sparepart for this problem, but as said in the Codex of the Samurai ,,It is bad, if one things comes two.“. So I tried my luck with my humongous welder, to repair the broken lever.
Lets say it like this, it was like shooting birds with canons. But the “Typewritergod“ was generous, and the operation worked out well. As you can see at one picture, it is just a perfect Pearl that connects the snapped thread.
Another intervention that took patients of some other kind, was the detachement of all Typelevers, to brush off the superficial rust. Mechanical intented, it is not so easy at first, to find the right method to it.

But anyway, after a few days of work this Continental Standard snurrs and bings again, like a kitten with a cowbell. There is something about those super succesful specimen of Typewriters, that makes you realize why they were in the first place, and after I putted so much work to it I naturally grew attached.

Anyway, now the time came to pass it on. Which is why I will sell it soon. But as my heart cries a little, I wanted to make a Gallery before.

1914 Continental Standard #72194

Status: Sightings
Hunter: Aaron Friedrich Lotar Rolf Klamp (Technokid)
Created: 02-08-2023 at 02:26AM
Last Edit: 02-24-2023 at 12:48PM


Description:

A Neighbor, who have heard of my hobby, once came to me, showing what he had just purchased at a near fleemarket, wanting to know if he had bought something valuable here, or at least, payed not to much for it.
It was very gringy, dusty, and overall not working, but with the 15€ he spent I told him, that it was ok but nothing of great value, as it is one of the most produced German Typewriters of all time.

So it stayed as Decoration at his place for some time, but when his Girlfriend got pregnant and they attempted to move to a bigger appartement, he wanted to sell the Continental again.
Of course he offered it to me, but I refused first, as I was and am allready stuffed with a lot of Patients, that were more interessting than this.

But when the date of moving came closer, and his online offer went fruitless, I accepted to adopt the „Conti“, to help him put it out of his head.

What I instantly liked about this Model is the way the mechanical solutions are aproached. It has all necessary features of its time, but for everyone of them they seemingly used some kind of lever, what make it all feels a little laborious, yet simultaneously solid and rational.

So one day, I started to give it full attention, taking it apart and cleaning. Everthing was stuck from dust and superficial rust. The Typelevers didn´t move willingly, as the segment was gringed. The shift-mechanism didn´t move cause of rust at the platen guiding. The backlever didn´t react, as there was an internal bended lever, which caused material fatique, that later made it snap in two. Presumably the gringed escapement in addition with brute force, has caused this in the first place.

Besides thorough cleaning and oiling, to get things going and defreeze the Carriage shift-mechanism, I had to wield somehow the snapped lever inside. Of course it would have bin compairable easy to find a sparepart for this problem, but as said in the Codex of the Samurai ,,It is bad, if one things comes two.“. So I tried my luck with my humongous welder, to repair the broken lever.
Lets say it like this, it was like shooting birds with canons. But the “Typewritergod“ was generous, and the operation worked out well. As you can see at one picture, it is just a perfect Pearl that connects the snapped thread.
Another intervention that took patients of some other kind, was the detachement of all Typelevers, to brush off the superficial rust. Mechanical intented, it is not so easy at first, to find the right method to it.

But anyway, after a few days of work this Continental Standard snurrs and bings again, like a kitten with a cowbell. There is something about those super succesful specimen of Typewriters, that makes you realize why they were in the first place, and after I putted so much work to it I naturally grew attached.

Anyway, now the time came to pass it on. Which is why I will sell it soon. But as my heart cries a little, I wanted to make a Gallery before.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:





The welded thread
The welded thread











Hunter: Aaron Friedrich Lotar Rolf Klamp (Technokid)

Aaron Friedrich Lotar Rolf Klamp's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 2736

Student of fine Arts, born and raised in Germany. Since October 2017 addicted to Typewriters with the focus on post war portables made of metall (not plastic).



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