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Home » Adler » Universal 200 » 198X #9649496
198X Adler Universal 200 Serial # 9649496 198X Adler Universal 200 typewriter, Serial # 9649496 Jake Fischer's 198X Adler Universal 200 typewriter. 2014-09-13 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Jake Fischer: 198X Adler Universal 200 Serial # 9649496 This behemoth of an office machine was used by my grandfather when he was a clerk for the local church. Many an important document was typed up on this machine.

My grandfather says that it was purchased around 1982 when the building was built. I have not really seen any machines this new, as the market became dominated by the IBM Selectric and the Word Processors.

This is a pretty standard machine except for the layout of the keyboard and the typeface. Normally, when one shifts numbers, you get symbols. On this one, you just get numbers. To get symbols, you have more keys.

The typeface is a 10 pitch "Tron-esque" style, straight out of a cheesy techno movie or Magnum P.I. episode. I think its quite interesting, and worthy to have a spot in my collection.

UPDATE: After figuring out that the carriage can be simply removed by disengaging two red levers underneath the ribbon cover, I have found many interesting quirks and features of this rather complex machine. I have also found the serial number, but it is far after any Adler Universal dates. Pretty much everything on this machine can be removed and "customized" for typist preference. After cleaning out an excessively large quantity of eraser shavings, it actually types quite nicely with a very smooth and surprisingly light carriage return. It also has an ingenious mechanical tabulator brake that may be operated with the use of magnets and springs. At first, I just thought that the tabulator was gunked up because of its slowness, but, in fact, it was meant to do that.

198X Adler Universal 200 #9649496

Status: My Collection
Created: 05-10-2014 at 11:36AM
Last Edit: 09-13-2014 at 08:50PM


Description:

This behemoth of an office machine was used by my grandfather when he was a clerk for the local church. Many an important document was typed up on this machine.

My grandfather says that it was purchased around 1982 when the building was built. I have not really seen any machines this new, as the market became dominated by the IBM Selectric and the Word Processors.

This is a pretty standard machine except for the layout of the keyboard and the typeface. Normally, when one shifts numbers, you get symbols. On this one, you just get numbers. To get symbols, you have more keys.

The typeface is a 10 pitch "Tron-esque" style, straight out of a cheesy techno movie or Magnum P.I. episode. I think its quite interesting, and worthy to have a spot in my collection.

UPDATE: After figuring out that the carriage can be simply removed by disengaging two red levers underneath the ribbon cover, I have found many interesting quirks and features of this rather complex machine. I have also found the serial number, but it is far after any Adler Universal dates. Pretty much everything on this machine can be removed and "customized" for typist preference. After cleaning out an excessively large quantity of eraser shavings, it actually types quite nicely with a very smooth and surprisingly light carriage return. It also has an ingenious mechanical tabulator brake that may be operated with the use of magnets and springs. At first, I just thought that the tabulator was gunked up because of its slowness, but, in fact, it was meant to do that.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:

This is the strange keyboard layout.  Plaque next to tab reads, " THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS PITCH CODE A."
This is the strange keyboard layout. Plaque next to tab reads, " THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS PITCH CODE A."

Profile view showing nice two tone crinkle and smooth finishes
Profile view showing nice two tone crinkle and smooth finishes

Adler Universal 200 and 1965 Royal Mercury to compare sizes.
Adler Universal 200 and 1965 Royal Mercury to compare sizes.

Have yet to find out what T-A orginisation is.  Maybe an importer or exporter from West Germany?
Have yet to find out what T-A orginisation is. Maybe an importer or exporter from West Germany?

Hunter: Jake Fischer (jfisch)

Jake Fischer's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 131

I am a typewriter collector and amateur repairman who became obsessed after typing at a young age on my grandfather's Olivetti Lettera 22, which he soon gave to me. Now I have had over ten typewriters in my collection, flipping the less valuable ones for a low price to fund my obsession.

At one point, I was weary of polish; now I see the wonderful shine that Meguiar's cleaning wax brings to a glossy paint. I still avoid polishing nickle or chrome, for I hear that patina is valuable on old metal. However, I refuse to use the devil's website, also known as Ebay. Just too many deaths by shipping...and unacceptably exuberant prices...



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Adler Universal 200 on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Adler Serial Number page and the Adler Universal 200 By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.