The Typewriter Database

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The Typewriter Database 1885 Hammond 1 Serial # 4698 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Martin Howard: 1885 Hammond 1 Serial # 4698 James Hammond was one of the great typewriter pioneers, beginning work on his remarkable machine in the late 1870s. It was patented in 1880 and was first manufactured in 1885.

The Hammond typewriter has a truly brilliant mechanical design and great looks too. Encased in mahogany and with solid ebony keys, it is of the highest quality.

Instead of using typebars, a split type-shuttle with hardened rubber characters (see detail below) rotates each way into position as the keys are pushed. Then a spring-loaded hammer swings from behind the carriage, striking the paper and ribbon against the type-shuttle to print. The constant force of the hammer gives an even impression to each character typed, regardless of how soft or hard the keys are pushed.

The type-shuttle is readily interchangeable, allowing for different fonts and languages. There were hundreds of choices available. "For every nation, for every tongue" was the slogan Hammond used to convey this versatility.

From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Martin Howard:
1885 Hammond 1

Typeface Specimen:


qr code

1885 Hammond 1
Serial #
4698

Status: My Collection
Created: 06-09-2017 at 11:28AM
Last Edit: 06-09-2017 at 11:28AM

Hammond Serial Numbers
Hammond Typewriter Galleries
Hammond 1 Typewriter Galleries

Description:

James Hammond was one of the great typewriter pioneers, beginning work on his remarkable machine in the late 1870s. It was patented in 1880 and was first manufactured in 1885.

The Hammond typewriter has a truly brilliant mechanical design and great looks too. Encased in mahogany and with solid ebony keys, it is of the highest quality.

Instead of using typebars, a split type-shuttle with hardened rubber characters (see detail below) rotates each way into position as the keys are pushed. Then a spring-loaded hammer swings from behind the carriage, striking the paper and ribbon against the type-shuttle to print. The constant force of the hammer gives an even impression to each character typed, regardless of how soft or hard the keys are pushed.

The type-shuttle is readily interchangeable, allowing for different fonts and languages. There were hundreds of choices available. "For every nation, for every tongue" was the slogan Hammond used to convey this versatility.


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Martin Howard
Username: MartinHoward

I am a collector of 19th century typewriters and have built a collection that shows the remarkable ingenuity and beauty of the world’s first typewriters. I have always been interested in the beginnings of a machine when there is an eruption of approaches to making it. Early typewriters are an exceptional example of this incubation period.

My website is antiquetypewriters.com